20160421

Bob Heman


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Thinks that words are inappropriate to the situation. Thinks that a single line is all that must be drawn.


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There were new books to put inside the elephant. There was a curtain that was supposed to hide the hippo. The birds came each time the song was sung. There was a word they were never allowed to say.


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You should tell them if they can’t see it on their own. You should use the color red, and the word “sequence.” Each time the man arrives he has a different expectation. Each time the bear arrives it is drawn differently.


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Discovers a door where the rabbits end and the number “three” begins. Finds roots large enough to hold up several houses. Carries enough water to float the fish. Uses the sky to rationalize the weight of gold.


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They have more frogs than can fit in the story. They have a turtle that fills the entire pond. They have a man whose outline is too large. They have a woman who is an exception to the rule.


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A hinge made of cloth. A frog made from an old potato. A door made out of a bar of soap.


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The same woman was sitting at both ends of the car.


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The word “once” repeated until they understand what it means.


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The game requires that they enter or leave, that they each take an animal with them, that they use words even when they don’t want to.


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In the ladder store they had to use the largest ladder to reach the top shelf.


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The difference between the door and the window, between the man and the woman, between the bear and the bee, between the word “arm” and all other words.




Bob Heman is a poet of the imagination. In the late 1970s he was an artist-in-residence at The Brooklyn Museum. He has edited CLWN WR (formerly Clown War) since the early 1970’s.
 
 
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